Craft Ideas for Kids

The best projects

No one has more imagination or creativity than a child. Don't let those talents lay idle! Here are a few craft ideas to get that young mind (and those little hands) busy.

Scrapbooking

So many moms have discovered this hobby, but it's ideal for a child too. Scrapbooking gives them the chance to do the cutting and pasting that they love, all while preserving the works of art they've made at home and at school. Better still, when they're done, you have more space on the fridge, and a wonderful album full of memories for when your child grows up. (An older child might be more interested in making a scrapbook of their friends and activities for themselves.)

Supplies: Album, colored paper, glue, scissors, mementos and any decorative supplies you like, such as glitter, stars, ribbon and stickers.

Jewelry Making

Your child can make their own jewelry out of polished stones or crystals that they've grown. Settings for rings, necklaces, broaches, string (bolo) ties, buttons and more are available at craft stores. You can buy polished stones, or better yet, find your own at the beach and polish them yourself (use a rock tumbler). Crystals can be bought, but are also easily grown. (That's a good science lesson too.)

Supplies:

Settings, glue, polished stones (or stones and a tumbler) or crystals.

Costume Making

No need to wait until Halloween is upon you - your child can start making costumes anytime! They're great for dress-up and plays, and design is only limited by the imagination. If you're hard-pressed for ideas, search the web for some creative inspiration.

Many teens enjoy costumes too, but tend to be more interested in Renaissance Festival designs. There will be sewing involved, but what a great skill for them to learn! All sorts of patterns can be found on the Internet.

Supplies: (vary by project)

Fabrics, glue, thread, needles, sewing machine, tape, markers, sequins and scissors.

Origami

The ancient art of paper-folding is fun to learn, and can produce truly amazing pieces. Regular paper works fine, though rice paper can be bought for the more skilled folder. Books on the art can be bought, but for getting started, there are websites aplenty.

Supplies:

Paper and directions.

Chalk Mural

If the weather is nice, your child can beautify the neighborhood with a giant chalk drawing. The driveway is a gigantic canvas, while the sidewalk is ideal for comic style drawings. Sidewalk chalk comes in buckets and is cheap!

Supplies:

Sidewalk chalk.

Custom Paint

Your child can personalize their room - let them paint pictures, designs or text on their walls. They can add to it as they age, or just paint over it completely and begin again.

Supplies:

Paint, brushes, sponges, stencils, floor covering and masking tape.

By Ernest Capraro